Litespeed vs Nginx? Is LiteSpeed More Powerful Than Nginx?

Question

Nginx Vs Litespeed Tech (WordPress Hosting Speed)
I was looking for some real-life reviews of WordPress sites hosted with Nginx or with LitespeedTech.

Is LiteSpeed really faster than Nginx? Litespeed vs Nginx Performance?
Why most of the managed WordPress service providers don’t use Litespeed if it’s faster than Nginx? litespeed vs nginx wordpress Managed Has Any Issue?
In terms of customization, security, and configuration which one is really good?

Whats your litespeed vs nginx benchmark? Every individual member’s comment will help me a lot.
Thanks

PS: I’m a new member here. Thanks to the admin(s) for approving my request.

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aliakkas38 11 months 11 Answers 595 views 0

Answers ( 11 )

  1. I use OpenLiteSpeed and LiteSpeed for various projects and I’ve been a big user of nginx over the years (and still have some nginx stuff running).

    Is LiteSpeed really faster than Nginx?

    if we look from an OpenLiteSpeed perspective, where I’ve used it for bigger sites that need dedicated environments, then OpenLiteSpeed (OLS from now on) is a lot faster especially if comparing it with nginx’s fastcgi cache in a real-world workload – if you’re having a ton of traffic on an nginx server with fascgi cache from normal browsers (that does brotli, gzip, deflate), then nginx will have to compress the response from the fastcgi cache on every single request – this isn’t really optimal when 95%+ of all traffic is compressed – so hands down OLS will beat nginx by far.

    Additionally, the fact that quite a lot of .htaccess rules work in OLS makes it so easy to integrate with existing software that is made “for” Apache servers.

    From a shared hosting perspective, I’d never run nginx, a big reason being lack of htaccess, and sure you can proxy stuff to an apache backend, but then you start complicating your stack, which you probably don’t wanna do anyway 🙂 For the same reason I use LSWS.

    Why most of the managed WordPress service providers don’t use Litespeed if it’s faster than Nginx?

    Equally, you could ask the same question about Apache, right? OLS (and LSWS) are gaining market share – people realize it’s a good solution – for some OLS makes sense, for others LSWS make sense – depends on what you’re trying to solve.

    We can’t hide the fact that nginx has been around a lot longer than OLS have for example – and that did help nginx gain quite a bit of market share over the years.

    In terms of customization, security, and configuration which one is really good?

    Again, boils down to what you’re trying to solve – there are things nginx can do that OLS or LSWS can’t do, and the other way around.

    The configuration for OLS differs from Apache and from nginx, while LSWS can read Apache configuration – each person has their own taste to which configuration is nice.

    From a security point of view, I believe most web servers these days are as secure as you make them – you can make pretty much any web server insecure by configuring it wrong.

    • Extremely Satisfied with your answer. When it comes to control panel, no one support OpenLiteSpeed. So we have only two choices, don’t use control panel or go with LSWS paid. To bring down the cost I thought to stick with apache or nginx, but after reading about litespeed they seem better to me. And using both control panel and litespeed paid will surely double the monthly spending per user. I don’t know if user really wants a control panel or not, in managed service cases.

      Anyways, I’ll think about the litespeed again, they seem to use cutting edge technologies, like brotli, HTTP3 (QUIC) etc, and their opensource version is also support some htaccess rules ( needs restart everytime )

      Thanks a lot.

  2. What web server software you are using will almost never be neither your bottleneck or something that has major impact on scalability or performance if you configure them correctly. Unless you have extreme traffic it doesn’t really matter so just use the web server you feel most comfortable with.

    I did a test with a WordPress site installed under nginx an litespeed server. I tried 8 different servers. At the end of my test I conclude the same. Unless you have extreme traffic I do not see a clear winner.

    Today’s issues are 99% never about extreme traffic but more because server configuration or inefficient software (bloated themes/plugins).

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    Sysadmin/site reliability engineer here. By Litespeed I am assuming you mean the Openlitespeed. All that matters is which server you are more comfortable with, which one you know better. I have years and years of experience with Nginx before it was even released and I can do anything I need with the free version of Nginx. It is lightning fast and very powerful piece of software.
    The reason why most web hosting companies do not use Litespeed is because all the good features are paid.

  3. I tested two WordPress installations, with Nginx and LiteSpeed. I really like the simplicity and out of the box configuration of LiteSpeed over Nginx. Especially, their WordPress plugin LSCache, which integrates directly with the server with Litespeed’s cache module… I was also really impressed by their drop-in replacement of apache configuration.

    +1 for automatic image optimization with auto jpg to webp conversion… I really liked this one. The features included in LiteSpeed can save dollars for me.

    So, everything was incredibly fast in my tests so far.

  4. I think you’re confusing effects with causes 🙂 Popularity is not the reason people pick NGINX – it’s POPULAR because it’s light, fast(er), and stable.
    And open source is not about “vibe” – it’s about thousands of best programmers “testing” it on their servers and contributing to the core.
    That’s why NGINX is so performant and stable. No strange, random bugs, CPU spikes, and RAM issues.

  5. In my experience, LiteSpeed easily faster than NGINX and especially when loading all options, modules, and features evenly. I think in many benchmarks where NGINX appears superior, they are using a naked-version and don’t have the same features available as LiteSpeed.

    – Managed WordPress providers don’t like using LiteSpeed because they want to customize their own user experience and have more branding control. NGINX is specially built and used by many sys-admins/dev-ops with many helpful configuration scripts already. It’s easy to hack and mod things the way you want.

    – Both can be secure and configured well. I would say if you had to ask this question, LiteSpeed would be the better pick for you. NGINX or OLS (OpenLiteSpeed) can be more fun or ideal option if you know what you’re doing and didn’t have to ask this question in the first place.

    LiteSpeed vs Nginx speed:

    – Speed comparisons really depend. By default, LiteSpeed Enterprise (paid) and OpenLiteSpeed (free) and NGINX (free) are installed with different options and configurations. That alone already makes it an unfair comparison. Surely, you wouldn’t race a Porche convertible against an Audi wagon and claim Porsche as definitively faster. Same with servers…with decent configurations, both LS and NGINX will perform well enough to make their speed difference a moot point. Both can load instantly and handle high load. From all the people I see arguing, they usually choose one over the other not because of speeds but because of their server-management style.

    – Why companies pick LiteSpeed or Nginx?

    Top reasons in favor of NGINX: popular, many admins use it and are familiar with it. It’s free, easily customizable (many scripts available also), love the open-source vibe. Feels very lightweight and snappy. A great choice for most basic sites being loaded onto micro-VPS. Being that many sites/servers start small and then grow over time, it’s easier to pick a simple free option and add slowly as you grow. LiteSpeed is less popular which many people have friction about because of having to switch away from their current server. LiteSpeed also costs money which makes it an unlikely solution for non-commercial sites. For this reason, people only consider LiteSpeed because it solves some pain point for them. This can be Apache/cPanel compatibility, standardized configuration (whereas NGINX feels like everyone has a different flavor/configuration), performance/security features.

    – I think what NGINX diehards like the most about NGINX (it’s customizability) is also part of why some admins don’t prefer it. LS just works out of the box. You don’t have to tweak and tinker for the right settings. It’s really easy for junior admins to start working with.

    – I think it would be nice for the NGINX experts here to take on LiteSpeed’s public offering to prove that NGINX is faster. They’re offering any NGINX expert a chance to reconfigure their NGINX test server to prove it can outperform their LS test server. If you’re going to claim all LS-winner reviews are biased, then why don’t you contribute to an open-testing one?

    – My personal experiences with LiteSpeed and NGINX. Speed was never the issue. Both are fast. I felt LiteSpeed was easier to configure and less work to manage overall. The cost is awesome considering the official and community support. LS management is very streamlined and already comes with an awesome LS cache plugin for WordPress. A huge bonus for WHM/cPanel compatibility If there was any turnoff, it would be the monthly cost and branding. Everything else is perfect. NGINX is really snappy and free which is awesome. More work to customize (although some admins love this tinkering), and loves of custom configurations. I hate that NGINX has yet to have a mature control panel for end users (sorry, VestaCP sucks IMO). The only way to really deliver a full Webhosting experience for end users is to make your own panel AND also to limit the options they can have (htaccess, email, etc). Higher speed and free, at the cost of useability and more management is not a good trade for me. I’ve been using LiteSpeed for 10 years now and love it the best. Every 1-2 years, I check in with NGINX to see if it’s faster or has any other features and never saw anything to give me a reason to switch. The day it actually IS faster is the day I’ll switch my personal stuff over to NGINX.

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    When I decided to investigate Litespeed, I spun up Google Compute Engines, with Apache, Nginx, and Litespeed, Ran load tests on them, scaled them up, scaled them down, etc.

    Litespeed won easily. Nginx second, Apache well that should be put in the bin ( from a performance point of view )

  6. As a shared hosting provider, Litespeed is amazing. Far easier to configure than anything else and it just works. Coupled with the great support and plugins for the cache, it’s a huge win. For the cost, it’s worthwhile.

    If you are running a WordPress site or two… it’s probably a great investment. It’s easy to deploy and essentially almost always “just works”.

    If you’d rather play with Nginx and invest your time into it… yah, you can get it running pretty fast. For me, it doesn’t work for shared hosting at all. We have tried it more than once…

    Now we recommend LiteSpeed to all our clients, shared, VPS, dedicated. It’s easier for us to support and the majority of our clients really do not want the configuration headaches of Nginx. Although a few run it still.

    As for your questions:

    “Is LiteSpeed really faster than Nginx?”

    In all of our in house testing, yes. We don’t test at supermassive scale though, we’re a small hosting company with a client base of mostly local businesses and such. Some are quite busy, but we’re not talking millions of page views a day or even month. So our testing has really been on a single dedicated machine or VPS.

    And, to be completely fair, we’re not absolute experts in Nginx configuration, so I am sure there are others who could set it up better than us. 🙂

    “Why most of the managed WordPress service providers don’t use Litespeed if it’s faster than Nginx?”

    I would assume one of a couple reasons:

    a) The Nginx enterprise support options were more appealing than Litespeed,

    b) Litespeed at a certain scale possibly has issues or lacks features?

    But I do not know. It’s not like they publish their reasoning on their stack.

    ” In terms of customization, security, and configuration which one is really good?”

    I’m not sure I follow. But, I’ll take a stab.

    Customization… Both are rather customizable.

    Security… well, I can’t recall ever seeing a hack occur on our network due to a web server exploit. The vast majority of hacks occur because the user installs a crappy theme or runs out of date plugins/installs. Your choice of the webserver isn’t really going to impact this much.

    Configuration? Litespeed enterprise is plug n play. It just works. Use the WordPress plugin and you’re gold. Litespeed wins on that hands

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    The idea that Litespeed “costs more” and that’s why ALL (that’s right: every SINGLE one) of the top enterprise WP hosts don’t use it… is…

    Horseshit. Complete and total horseshit.

    Let’s check in with Pagely and Automattic and Kinsta and ask their CEOs, CTOs, and head systems people why they’re using Nginx.

    I’m guessing we’re *NOT* going to hear:

    “Well, at $16/month it’s just not economical on these plans that we charge $20,000 for.”

    Nginx, aside from their open source offering, ALSO has a paid premium option.

    And it’s MORE expensive than Litespeed, not less!

    I’m pretty sure also that they’re paying attention to the cost benefit analysis on these kinds of things.

    Seeing as though… it’s their WHOLE BUSINESS!

    They buy infrastructure resources for X and sell them for Y… don’t you think that they would want to optimize that process?!?!

    Oh, that’s right, they’re cheapskates. They’re too busy cutting corners on some squirt-of-piss monthly fee.

    Got it. Right.

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